THE MAGAZINE

Duress systems

In the oft-spoofed television ad for a personal alarm, an elderly woman cries "I've fallen and I can't get up." As security professionals are well aware, it's not just the elderly and infirm who benefit from duress systems. Correctional officers, who are constantly at risk of being attacked, also need a quick way to call for assistance. The National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense have pulled together information on commercial systems and prepared a selection guide for correctional officers. Correctional Officer Duress Systems: Selection Guide provides detailed information on nine commercially available systems and vendor contact information. The guide divides duress alarms into three types. First are panic-button alarms, which are often found in banks. Second are identification alarms, which officers carry; they work by broadcasting a wireless signal to a nearby sensor, which forwards the alarm to a central console. Third are identification/location alarms, which are similar to ID alarms but can also track corrections staff and pinpoint alarm locations. The guide describes the benefits and drawbacks of each type of alarm. For example, while identification/location alarms provide the most information, they are also most costly and difficult to install. Links to both the report and a summary of it can be found on SM Online.

AttachmentSize
correction_guide1204.pdf1.46 MB
correction_summary1204.pdf292.64 KB

Comments

Duress Alarms







It’s very important to create safe work environments for employees.   With TTI Guardian’s services, they provide the best knowledge and experience in Duress Alarms.    They also provide information on evacuation plans, emergency safety procedures, and system monitoring.  Check out their website for more information at http://ttiguardian.com.

 

 

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