THE MAGAZINE

Software Forensics: Collecting Evidence from the Scene of a Digital Crime.

By Ben Rothke, CISSP

Software Forensics: Collecting Evidence from the Scene of a Digital Crime. By Robert M. Slade; published by McGraw-Hill, 800/262-4729 (phone), www.mcgraw-hill.com (Web); pages; $39.95.

Most people know at least a little about forensics, if just from television shows like CSI. Computer forensics are a different matter altogether. Given the unglamorous technical work involved, is there little wonder that prime-time television does not air a show called Computer Forensic Geeks? While not ideal material for adapta-tion into a prime-time drama, Software Forensics: Collecting Evidence from the Scene of a Digital Crime enlightens the reader by providing a pretty good high-level introduction to the core concepts of computer software forensics.

Author Robert Slade mines solid detail, including listing specific software tools that can be used to identify and track virus creators, however unlikely corporate America might be to invest resources for such an effort. Slade discusses legal rules of evidence and emphasizes the importance of keeping evidence pristine so that its veracity is unshakable.

As a high-level introduction, the book is a good choice. But for more advanced practitioners, much of this material will be common knowledge.


Reviewer: Ben Rothke, CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional), is a New York City-based senior security consultant with ThruPoint, Inc. He is a member of ASIS International.

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