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Morning Security Brief: Companies Focus on Compliance in China, U.S. Plans Cyberattack, Holder Asks for Legislation, and More

By Teresa Anderson

► In a report released yesterday, the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai noted that companies are focusing on compliance issues in the coming year. Reuters reports that, of the 400 firms polled for the Chamber’s study, 44.2 percent said they were focusing greater attention on compliance issues in 2014. This number is up from 36.6 percent in 2012. More than four in 10 companies interviewed said they would increase compliance spending in the upcoming year. Corporate corruption made the news recently after a series of investigations against major U.S. firms doing business in China.

The New York Times reports that the United States developed a “battle plan that featured a sophisticated cyberattack on the Syrian military” in the spring of 2011. Ultimately President Obama declined to use the cyber weapons because of “larger concerns about a new and untested tactic with the potential to transform the nature of warfare.” The cyber weapons were aimed at Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s command structure, particularly the military’s ability to launch airstrikes. The article notes that there has been no evidence that the United States has used cyber weapons since the Stuxnet computer worm was revealed to have U.S. origins.

► In a video message released yesterday, Attorney General Eric Holder called on Congress to establish a “strong, national standard” for alerting the public when a data breach has occurred. Holder said that such a standard would help prevent such events in the future. “This would empower the American people to protect themselves if they are at risk of identity theft. It would enable law enforcement to better investigate these crimes—and hold compromised entities accountable when they fail to keep sensitive information safe,” Holder said.

► In other news: The United Arab Emirates plans to double its spending on homeland security from $5 billion to $10 billion over the next decade. New York state is creating the first college dedicated to homeland security and emergency preparedness, potentially in Syracuse. A report finds that school security incidents in parts of Australia are at an all-time high.
 

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