NEWS

Morning Security Brief: Sharing Biometric Data, TWIC Errors, Bay Area Copper Thefts, and More

By Carlton Purvis

 

►The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) published a revised biometric standard in November that expands the quantity and type of data shared internationally to identify victims and solve crimes. This is the first international standard for the exchange of DNA data. The standard also defines how to specify and share the geo-positioning coordinates of biometric sample collection.

►TSA recently issued a notice that 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) cards won’t work with card readers because they were improperly encoded. TWIC cards allow transportation workers unescorted access to secure areas.“Due to a card production system error, the number of characters in the FASC-N on some TWICs was shortened (truncated), causing readers to not recognize the card as a valid TWIC,” TSA said. All cards issued before April 5, 2011, could potentially be affected. TSA says it will replace these cards at the cardholder’s request at no cost and has provided a list online of the impacted card numbers.

►The San Francisco Chronicle examines the rise in copper theft in the Bay Area. A BART transit project was delayed 10 months after thieves stole hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of metal from the site. In Vallejo, city officials said thieves stripped copper from 77 street lights, leaving parts of the city in darkness.

► A State Department audit of U.S. guns sold to Mexico in 2009 found that more than 26 percent of guns ended up in the “wrong hands.”► The first plea from a Hutaree Militia member came on Monday when Joshua Clough pleaded guilty to weapons charges. The militia members were arrested last Spring after a plan to kill a law enforcement officer then launch a large scale attack at the subsequent funeral was discovered by authorities. ► And a Michigan man was sentenced Monday to six months in jail after he remotely hacked his local library’s Internet signal to download child porn to his computer.

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