NEWS

Morning Security Brief: Whistleblowers Sue the FDA, Couple Barred From U.S. Over Tweets, Email Providers Fight Spam, and More

By Carlton Purvis

►A group of FDA whistleblowers are suing the agency for monitoring their personal e-mails. In past testimony, the scientists told Congress that the FDA was approving medical devices that they believed posed risks to patients. For the next two years, their personal e-mails were monitored at work. The information from these e-mails “eventually contributed to the harassment or dismissal of all six of the FDA employees,” CBS reports.

►Two British travelers were detained and barred from entering the United States after one of them said he wanted to “destroy” America in a conversation on Twitter. In another part of the conversation, he said he’d be “diggin' Marilyn Monroe up,” quoting the American TV show Family Guy. “Despite telling officials the term 'destroy' was British slang for 'party', they were held on suspicion of planning to 'commit crimes' and had their passports confiscated,’ the Daily Mail reports. Federal agents also searched their luggage looking for spades and shovels. They were interrogated for five hours at LAX before being taken to holding cells and deported 12 hours later. U.S. authorities say the travelers were deported because they had “intentions of coming to the United States to commit crimes.”

►The world’s 15 top e-mail providers have teamed up to create DMARC.org (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance), a technology working group that is developing standards to reduce the threat of spam and phishing.

►In other news, authorities in Utah take down a false document ring. ♦ Human Rights Watch says India’s border security forces are out of control, beating and torturing people it detains. ♦ Slate talks about how fake white-powder scares have become a real problem. ♦ And three shipments of orange juice from Brazil have been detained at the border after they tested positive for the fungicide carbendazim. In the U.S., carbendazim is illegal to use on citrus fruits. 

 

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