NEWS

Public-Private Partnerships Pay off in Cybersecurity

By Laura Spadanuta

A broad coalition of business, civil liberties, and internet security groups has issued a white paper supporting the continued use of public-private partnerships to fight cybercrime rather than go in a more government-led direction.

The paper, "Improving our Nation's Cybersecurity through the Public-Private Partnership," was released last week by the business groups the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Business Software Alliance, and TechAmerica; cybersecurity group the Internet Security Alliance (ISA); and civil liberties watchdog the Center for Democracy and Technology.

The white paper points out the the current public-private partnerships that have evolved to fight cybersecurity are fairly effective.  Some of the accomplishments of industry-government partnerships are the development of standards and best practices, the completion of a National Cyber Incident Response Plan, the successful execution of Cyber Storm exercises, improvement in information sharing, and risk assessments.

The paper points out that when properly put together, the public-private partnership can also provide privacy and civil liberty advantages over more "government-directed models." For example, the public-private partnerships entrust monitoring to private networks with private sector operators rather than government agencies and promote transparency. 

There is concern that "new policy initiatives may consider replacing the current model with an alternate system more reliant on government mandates directed at the private sector.  This change of direction would undermine the program that has been made and hinder efforts to achieve lasting success," states the report. 

Comments

Another reason for anargument for fair use / full disclosure

Call me a communist if you like, (I'm not), but I can't help but think that if a fair use / full disclosure policy was developed and implemented properly between these "cooperating" organizations AND the government, they might actually be effective.  The real issue is the development and enforcement of a univesally rock solid non-disclosure policy, especially when it comes to the media.  Not that I am in favor of media censorship, but lets face facts.  At least in American journalism, a fair amount of "news information" is more often than not sensationalized and spun to entice people like conspiracy theorists and stir up the general unrest among the general population.

Yet another argument for fair use / full disclosure

Call me a communist if you like, (I'm not), but I can't help but think that if a fair use / full disclosure policy was developed and implemented properly between these "cooperating" organizations AND the government, they might actually be effective.  The real issue is the development and enforcement of a univesally rock solid non-disclosure policy, especially when it comes to the media.  Not that I am in favor of media censorship, but lets face facts.  At least in American journalism, a fair amount of "news information" is more often than not sensationalized and spun to entice people like conspiracy theorists and stir up the general unrest among the general population.

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