NEWS

Russia's "Dad of All Bombs"

By Matthew Harwood

Russia declared today it has successfully tested the most powerful non-nuclear, air-delivered bomb in history, reports CNN.com.

If this is true, the Russians have created a weapon much more awesome than the U.S.'s "Mother of All Bombs"—until today,  the most powerful non-nuclear bomb ever devised.

CNN.com explains:

The U.S. Massive Ordnance Air Blast... is a large-yield satellite-guided, air-delivered bomb described as the most powerful non-nuclear weapon in history.

Channel One said that while the Russian bomb contains 7.8 tons of high explosives compared to more than 8 tons of explosives in the U.S. bomb, it's four times more powerful because it uses a new, highly efficient type of explosives that the report didn't identify.

While the U.S. bomb is equivalent to 11 tons of TNT, the Russian one is equivalent to 44 tons of regular explosives. The Russian weapon's blast radius is 990 feet, twice as big as that of the U.S. design, the report said.

Like its U.S. predecessor, first tested in 2003, the Russian bomb is a "thermobaric" weapon that explodes in an intense fireball combined with a devastating blast. It explodes in a terrifying nuclear bomb-like mushroom cloud and wreaks destruction through a massive shock wave created by the air burst and high temperature.

Proudly displaying their one-upmanship of the United States, the Russians have nicknamed their new weapon, "the Dad of All Bombs."

This is just one more example of Russia's bid to regain its superpower status on the world stage, lost when the Soviet Union crumbled.

As the U.K.'s Telegraph notes:

Since Mr Putin, an ex-KGB officer, came to power, Russia's annual defence spending has been quadrupled.

In addition, the Kremlin has announced a £100 billion military modernisation programme.

The new bomb is further proof that Russia's military has regained its technological edge. New ground and sea launched nuclear missiles have also been developed.

On a lighter note—apparently without sarcasm—Col.-Gen. Alexander Rukshin, a deputy chief of the Russian military's General Staff, said another benefit of the bomb is that this bomb, unlike a nuclear bomb, is eco-friendly.

 

 

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