NEWS & ANALYSIS

Morning Security Brief: TSA Examines Policies, White House Rejects Clemency, and a Task Force Makes Torture Claims

Transportation Security Administration officials are examining policies in response to Friday’s shooting. The White House has rejected a clemency request from Edward Snowden. An independent panel charges that doctors and psychologists working for the U.S. military tortured suspected terrorists.

Shooting at LAX: UPDATE: Suspected gunman identified as 23-year-old Paul Anthony Ciancia

At about 9:30 a.m. Pacific Time, a shooter opened fire in Terminal 3 at Los Angeles International Airport. A TSA agent has died of gunshot wounds. The gunman, at first reported dead, is apparently in custody and his condition is not clear. Six others are reportedly wounded.

Morning Security Brief: Healthcare.gov's Security Troubles, a Background Check Hearing, and More

The government knew about Healthcare.gov security problems before its launch, a hearing on background checks, and more.

Morning Security Brief: NSA Hacked Data Centers, Adobe Customers Compromised, And More

The NSA has infiltrated Yahoo and Google data centers without the companies' consent, a cyberattack affected far more users than Adobe initially reported, internal memos reveal that security concerns regarding the HealthCare.gov site were voiced before its launch, and more.

Morning Security Brief: Terrorist Attacks Hit Record Numbers, Cybersecurity Bills, Critical Infrastructure Attacks, and More

A new report shows terrorist attacks and fatalities at an all-time high. Two bills are in the works in the United States that boost government cybersecurity research and development and increase the pool of critical infrastructure cybersecurity workers. A number of Mexican critical infrastructure sites have been attacked during the past week. Dutch police have arrested hackers who used malware to steal more than $1.4 million from online banking customers.

Morning Security Brief: NSA Spying in Spain, HealthCare.gov Fixes Major Security Flaw, Terrorism in Beijing, And More

A Spanish newspaper reports that the NSA spied on tens of millions of phone calls in the country; a security flaw in the design of HealthCare.gov that could have exposed personal information to hackers has been fixed; the Chinese government says it believes the deadly car crash in Tiananmen Square was a suicide attack; and more.

Morning Security Brief: Hospital Security, Terrorism Laws, Al-Qaeda in Iraq, Checks on Foreign Investors, and More

Staff at a hospital in China protest lax security. Russian’s parliament passes a new law to prevent terrorism ahead of the Winter Olympics. An al-Qaeda affiliate detonates nine car bombs in Baghdad. And more.

Morning Security Brief: Security Leaders are Gaining Strategic Ground, LinkedIn's New App is Vulnerable, and More

Security executives are gaining strategic ground, LinkedIn's new app is vulnerable, and more.

Morning Security Brief: White House Staffer Fired For Tweets, Preliminary Cybersecurity Framework Out, And More

A National Security Council staffer was fired after a government probe revealed he was tweeting government criticisms--and possibly sensitive information--from an anonymous account. NIST has released the Preliminary Cybersecurity Framework. German and U.S. officials are meeting today to discuss a possible phone hacking scandal, and ethical hackers found weaknesses in the stock market system.

Book Review: Pre-Employment Background Investigations for Public Safety Professionals

While few books deserve five stars, this excellent work deserves at least that. Author Frank Colaprete is a former police lieutenant with an impressive résumé. His academic acumen and scholarship shine brightly in this easy-to-read and informative text.
 




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