NEWS & ANALYSIS

U.S. Supreme Court Clarifies "Honest Services" Fraud

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a lower court must reexamine the conviction of former Enron executive Jeffrey Skilling because of the "honest services" statute's vagueness.

Supreme Court Rules that Humanitarian Aid to Terrorist Organizations is Illegal

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a law prohibiting “material support” to terrorist organizations also bans support intended for an organization’s humanitarian activities.

Supreme Court Rules Against Officers in Privacy Case

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a police department did not violate the constitutional rights of police officers when it read through their text messages. The review of the text messages did not violate the Fourth Amendment, according to the ruling, because it was undertaken for work-related purposes and was not excessive in scope.

Amendment to Defense Bill Would Prevent Transfer of Guantanamo Prisoners

A amendment to the 2011 defense department authorization bill would prohibit the transfer of Guantanamo Bay detainees to the United States.

New Bill Would Make it Easier to Prosecute Identity Theft

A new bill introduced in Congress would make it easier for the federal government to prosecute identity theft cases.

Advocacy Group Claims Ruling Illegally Expands Privacy Protections to Companies

A nonprofit advocacy group claims that a appellate court decision guts the Freedom of Information Act by applying its privacy protections to companies.

Customs Search that Uncovered Child Pornography is Constitutional

The suspicionless search of a crewmember’s cabin aboard a ship did not violate the crewmember’s Fourth Amendment rights to be free of unreasonable search and seizure.

Morning Security Brief: Terrorists Convictions, Pirate Tribunals, and Executive Protection

Egypt convicts Hezbollah-backed terrorists, the United Nations Security Council pushes for stronger action against pirates, and companies cut back on executive protection.

Attorney Requests Access to Computers of Possible "Voyeur" School Administrator

An attorney for a student who was surreptitiously photographed via a school-issued laptop has requested additional discovery after learning that the school took thousands of photos of other students.

Senate Hearing Weighs Closing Video Surveillance Loophole

Lawmakers examined whether a decades-old wiretapping statute needs revision in light of a suburban Philadelphia high school that allegedly used a webcam to spy on a student.
 




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