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Surveillance

- An inexpensive surveillance application reviewed this month has a wide range of security features and controls. Its functions include motion detection, e-mail alerts, and automatic video recording and playback. Go online to see how it works.

False Imprisonment

- A man whose coworkers locked him in a lavatory for approximately 25 minutes may not pursue his false imprisonment case against his employer. The man was locked inside the lavatory on a ship during a corporate event by his coworkers as a prank. A jury found that the man’s confinement was “brief or fleeting” and did not rise to the level of false imprisonment.

Searches

- A man sued the government for violation of his Fourth Amendment rights after a pat-down at an airport checkpoint revealed 700 Oxycodone pills hidden on his body. The court ruled that the pat-down was reasonable because the man consented to the search and could have withdrawn from the search at any time.

Counterinsurgency

- A new Rand study looks at the ways that freedom of movement within a conflict zone could signal the success of counterinsurgency efforts. However, the report warns that the data can be misleading. Read the report online to learn more.

Privacy

- A state supreme court has ruled that an employee may pursue her invasion of privacy claim against her employer after she discovered a video camera in the company bathroom. The employer, who had placed the camera there in an attempt to document wrongdoing, argued that there was no invasion of privacy because the camera was not working.

Fusion Centers

- All fusion centers must have a DHS-approved privacy policy in place to receive federal grant funding. The policy is designed to protect the civil liberties of U.S. citizens. Read more about how one fusion center, the Colorado Information Analysis Center, developed its policy.

GPS Tracking

- A state appeals court has ruled that in a case where an employer suspected that an employee was falsifying time sheets, it was not a violation of privacy to place a GPS tracking device on the employee’s car and record his movements for 30 days.

Intelligence

- In a dispute over the accuracy of government intelligence reports, a federal appeals court has ruled that a lower court erred when it refused to accept such a report in the case of a Guantanamo detainee. By accepting the report, the court noted, the burden of proof correctly shifts to the plaintiff to prove that the facts are incorrect.

Cruise Ship Security

- The Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act (CVSSA) of 2010 imposes safety and security requirements, the majority of which are now in effect, on cruise lines that do business in the United States. Read the legislation online.

Privacy

- Law enforcement does not need a warrant to obtain the IP addresses for Twitter users, according to a recent decision. In investigating contributors to Wikileaks, the federal government asked Twitter to turn over the suspects’ account information. A U.S. district court ruled that the government does not need a warrant and that Twitter users have no expectations of privacy.

Emergency Alerts

- New technology is helping implement a 2006 executive order directing the Department of Homeland Security to develop a next-generation public alert system. See the original directive.

Excessive Force

- A federal appeals court has ruled that the parents of a teenager killed by police may pursue their excessive-force lawsuit. The teen was armed with a pocketknife and was threatening to kill himself. An appellate court instructed the lower court to determine whether the officers could reasonably suspect that the teenager posed an immediate threat to their safety.

GPS Tracking

- The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that police officers need a warrant to track a suspect’s movements using GPS, but there’s more nuance than first meets the eye. Read the ruling here.
 




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