INFORMATION

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School Security

- Video Insight and STANLEY Security offer grants to schools for security equipment. Video Insight donates equipment to one school each month, and STANLEY Security provides four grants at the end of the year, based on a contest held in the autumn.

Liability

- A company is not liable for injuries sustained in a vehicle accident caused by one of its employees. The employee, though driving a company truck, was acting outside the scope of his employment when the accident occurred because the employee was traveling to meet his wife on a purely personal errand.

Noncompete Agreements

- A state appeals court has ruled that a company’s noncompete agreement is unenforceable because it is overbroad. The court ruled that the company has “no protectable interest in public information” and “cannot deem by fiat all information…acquired through employment is confidential.”

Privacy

- To prevail under a California law requiring the protection of personal health information, a plaintiff must prove that the information was accessed by unauthorized individuals. Alleging that the information could have been accessed is insufficient.

Drug Testing

- New York’s high court has ruled that a parolee can sue a third-party laboratory after the lab reported erroneous results on a drug test. The parolee accused the laboratory of negligent testing because it failed to conduct a back-up test to correct for a known high false-positive rate.

Border Security

- The Department of Homeland Security is upgrading the TECS Modernization system (TECS Mod) to improve screening of foreign visitors to the United States. A recent GAO report found that TECS Mod, which has already incurred costs upwards of $1.5 billion, is unlikely to meet its 2015 deadline.

Canine Evidence

- The Supreme Court ruled in Florida v. Harris that drug- or bomb-detection dogs can give police probable cause to search private property if they alert officers to potential illegal activities and are properly trained.

Officer Oversight

- The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Protective Service, which contracts approximately 13,500 security officers at federal facilities, was found to lack oversight procedures in training officers for active-shooter scenarios and x-ray scanner usage in a report by the GAO.

Data Breaches

- In 2012, federal agencies reported 22,156 data breaches, an increase of 111 percent from 2009. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that while most federal agencies have policies for responding to a data breach, all of those policies are different. The GAO made 23 recommendations to update and standardize federal agency response.

Religious Discrimination

- A federal court has awarded a former security officer more than $50,000 in back wages and attorney’s fees after he was fired for refusing to shave his beard as requested by his employer. The officer kept his beard closely cropped but maintained that the beard was part of his religious observance. The court found that the company’s request was religious discrimination.

Staffing

-  After Idaho brought a lawsuit over excessive violence at the Idaho Correctional Center, Corrections Corporation of American (CCA) agreed to maintain adequate security staff. A federal court has ruled that there is still “a persistent failure to fill required mandatory positions, along with a pattern of CCA staff falsifying records to make it appear that all posts were filled.” CCA must now submit to an independent monitor and report regularly to the court. The court also established a fine of $100 for every hour that a mandatory post is vacant after a grace period of 12 hours.

Medical Identity Theft

- Medical identity theft occurs when personal information is used by unauthorized individuals to obtain medical care, buy drugs, or submit fake billings to Medicare or insurance companies. A new survey from the Ponemon Institute and the Medical Identity Fraud Alliance looks at the scope of the problem. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Tips also provides tips on protecting your medical identity.

Employment

- In a recent court case, an employer was found liable for a car accident caused by an employee because the employee was required to use her personal vehicle for work-related trips. 
 




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