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Site Map - Legal Issues

Background Screening

- The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a background screening case in which 28 employees of the California Institute of Technology, under contract to do work for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), have claimed that the government’s screening policy is too intrusive. The policy was implemented in 2004 under a government homeland security directive.

Legal Report

- An employee is awarded $1.5 million in a retaliation suit, and parents sue their son's school after learning that officials spied on him via Webcam. Also, legislation on cruise ship safety, airport security, biometrics, and firearms. 

Attorney Requests Access to Computers of Possible "Voyeur" School Administrator

- An attorney for a student who was surreptitiously photographed via a school-issued laptop has requested additional discovery after learning that the school took thousands of photos of other students.

State Legislation: Indiana: Firearms

- A new bill (S.B. 25) pending in the Indiana General Assembly would make it illegal for a company to prohibit employees from keeping firearms locked in their cars on company property. The bill would also apply to contract employees. Exemptions are provided for schools, penal institutions, and domestic violence shelters.

State Legislation: Georgia: Copper Theft

- A new Georgia law (formerly S.B. 82) regulates the secondary sale of metals such as copper and provides penalties for the theft of such metals. Under the new law, anyone purchasing the materials must obtain a photocopy of the seller’s driver’s license. If the metal being purchased is part of a motor vehicle, the seller must provide the title or a certificate from the state designating that the car can be sold as scrap. Under the new law, selling stolen metal valued at more than $500 is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 and up to five years in prison.

Elsewhere in the Courts: Terrorism

- A federal court upheld the sentencing of disbarred attorney Lynne Stewart, who was convicted of passing messages from her client Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman to his followers.

Legal Report

- A company that fired a potentially violent employee is not guilty of discrimination and a plaintiff who deleted e-mail loses the right to pursue the case. Also, legislative updates.

State Lawmakers Defeat Bill Banning Biometrics

- Lawmakers in New Hampshire have defeated a bill that would have banned biometrics.

U.S. Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Background Screening Case

- The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a background screening case in which 28 contract employees claim that the government’s screening policy is too intrusive.

Legislation Would Provide Security Fix

- New legislation would help the security industry bypass an energy efficiency standard it says shouldn't apply to security companies.

Terrorism

- A U.S. citizen who was wrongly accused of involvement in the 2004 Madrid train bombing and held for two weeks under suspicion of terrorism may not pursue his lawsuit against the government, a federal appeals court has ruled. According to the court, since the government already promised to destroy all surveillance materials and compensated the citizen monetarily, he had nothing left to sue over.

Online Privacy and Security Certificate Company Settles with FTC

- A company that verifies whether retail and other Web sites adequately secure customers' personal information has agreed to settle charges with the Federal Trade Commission that it misled its customers.

Intellectual Property Rights Advocates Running Amok?

- Open Source Software (OSS) is software developed collaboratively by people willing to share the code free of charge. The owners of the code do not object to its use, but some groups want use of OSS treated as piracy because they say it creates a mind-set that might lead to intellectual property theft.
 




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