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Legal Report

- A company that fired a potentially violent employee is not guilty of discrimination and a plaintiff who deleted e-mail loses the right to pursue the case. Also, legislative updates.

State Lawmakers Defeat Bill Banning Biometrics

- Lawmakers in New Hampshire have defeated a bill that would have banned biometrics.

U.S. Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Background Screening Case

- The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a background screening case in which 28 contract employees claim that the government’s screening policy is too intrusive.

Legislation Would Provide Security Fix

- New legislation would help the security industry bypass an energy efficiency standard it says shouldn't apply to security companies.

Terrorism

- A U.S. citizen who was wrongly accused of involvement in the 2004 Madrid train bombing and held for two weeks under suspicion of terrorism may not pursue his lawsuit against the government, a federal appeals court has ruled. According to the court, since the government already promised to destroy all surveillance materials and compensated the citizen monetarily, he had nothing left to sue over.

Online Privacy and Security Certificate Company Settles with FTC

- A company that verifies whether retail and other Web sites adequately secure customers' personal information has agreed to settle charges with the Federal Trade Commission that it misled its customers.

Intellectual Property Rights Advocates Running Amok?

- Open Source Software (OSS) is software developed collaboratively by people willing to share the code free of charge. The owners of the code do not object to its use, but some groups want use of OSS treated as piracy because they say it creates a mind-set that might lead to intellectual property theft.

Webcamgate: Student Accuses Suburban Philly High School of Using Webcam to Spy on Him

- A 15-year-old student and his parents have sued a suburban Philadelphia school district after discovering administrators covertly snapped pictures of him while at home on his school-owned laptop computer.

Jury Awards $1.5 Million in Retaliation Case

- A jury has found that a woman was wrongfully terminated after she gave negative information about a coworker during an internal investigation.

State Legislation: Washington: Stalking

- A new law (formerly S.B. 1856) establishes new rights for tenants who are being stalked or harassed by their landlords or employees of their landlords. Under the new law, such victims may be released from the terms of their rental agreement. If the victim wishes to stay in the property, he or she may change the locks on their doors without the landlord’s permission. If the harasser has left the landlord’s employ, the tenant must provide the landlord with a key to the new lock. If the tenant has a restraining order against the landlord, the tenant need not provide a key. In such cases, the landlord may enter the rental property in an emergency if accompanied by law enforcement or a fire official acting in his or her official capacity.

9-11 Terrorism Trial Could Move to New Venue Because of Security and Cost Concerns

- Political opposition, the threat of terrorism, and security costs have begun to eat away at the Justice Department's decision to try the mastermind behind the 9-11 attacks and four co-conspirators in federal court in Manhattan, according to numerous media reports today.

Christmas Day Bomber Indicted

- The Department of Justice charged the 23-year-old Nigerian yesterday with trying to blow up an airliner on Christmas Day.

Negligence

- A California court has ruled that a company can be responsible for a crash that occurred after a tow truck was stolen from its parking lot. The convicted gang member crashed the truck into a bus stop, killing three people.
 




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