INFORMATION

Site Map - Crime

Did You Know That?

- Only about 17 percent of police chiefs believe that terrorism or violent crime are "extremely serious" or "quite serious" problems in their communities. By contrast, 63 percent believe that drug abuse reaches that level of gravity. The figures come from a survey commissioned by the Police Foundation and Drug Strategies. @ Survey results are on SM Online.

iPods Sing for Investigators

- More than just the newest cool toys, iPods have become a tool of the trade for crooks and, consequently, a rich source of evidence for forensic experts who know how to take note of their incriminating content.

School crime

- Forget the Mayberry stereotype. The latest data show that the percentage of students at rural schools that reported being bullied in 2003 (10 percent) was greater than at urban and suburban schools (seven percent each). And that difference has doubled since 1999, according to the 2004 edition of Indicators of School Crime and Safety, a publication of the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Partnering with Professors

- Local law enforcement agencies can address cybercrime more effectively by looking for help from local schools and businesses, according to an article in the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin by Chief Tony Aeilts, who heads the California State University Police Department in San Luis Obispo, California.

A Site To See

- The U.S. Department of Justice has a division devoted to cybercrime issues. The Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS), in the Criminal Division of the department, provides manuals on searching, seizing, and preserving computer evidence. The site also details policies, cases, guidance, and laws related to hacking and intellectual-property crime, and provides information on teaching cyberethics to children. @ CCIPS is this month's A Site to See. Link to it via SM Online.

Partnering with Professors

- Local law enforcement agencies can address cybercrime more effectively by looking for help from local schools and businesses, according to an article in the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin by Chief Tony Aeilts, who heads the California State University Police Department in San Luis Obispo, California. @ Link to "Defending Against Cybercrime and Terrorism: A New Role for Universities" at SM Online.

A Site to See

- The U.S. Department of Justice has a division devoted to cybercrime issues. The Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS), in the Criminal Division of the department, provides manuals on searching, seizing, and preserving computer evidence. The site also details policies, cases, guidance, and laws related to hacking and intellectual-property crime, and provides information on teaching cyberethics to children. @ CCIPS is this month's A Site to See. Link to it via SM Online.

Incident reporting.

- Contending with bad breath and nervous patients, dentists and hygienists have plenty of challenges. One university is also training them to stop abuse by reporting broken jaws and suspiciously chipped teeth—signs of family violence. Because 60 percent of abuse cases involve head and neck injuries, which dental professionals are uniquely suited to identify, the University of Minnesota’s School of Dentistry and the Program Against Sexual Violence created a training program to deal with patients affected by family violence. The program discusses the dynamics of abuse, teaches dental students and professionals how to intervene in and report violence, and shows how to identify community service providers and establish office protocols.A report by the Justice Department’s Office for Victims of Crime indicates that the training “made a significant, positive impact in teaching dental professionals how to identify and report cases of abuse.” The report urges that this training be integrated into dental schools, dental hygiene programs, and dental associations. Read it on SM Online.

Study Questions CCTV’s Value

- In an expansive 160-page report written for the U.K. Home Office, which is responsible for domestic issues, Professor Martin Gill and Angela Spriggs did not find conclusive proof of CCTV’s beneficial effect on crime in town and city centers, parking areas, hospitals, and residential zones. Read the report.

Motel security

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Should Police Respond to Alarms?

- The evidence clearly indicates that unverified response pulls resources to areas where they are not really needed.

Essentials of the Reid Technique: Criminal Interrogation and Confessions

- Many experts consider the Reid Technique to be the leading method on interviewing and interrogation and Criminal Interrogation and Confessions to be the seminal textbook on the subject. Now the developers of the Reid Technique have created an abridged version of the classic textbook, called Essentials of the Reid Technique: Criminal Interrogation and Confessions.
 




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