INFORMATION

Site Map - Privacy

A Site To See

- There is a tension between security and privacy, and since 9-11 it can be argued that public opinion has leaned more toward the former at the expense of the latter. For that reason, groups that are fighting to maintain or increase the privacy rights of citizens are more important than ever. The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) is a leading advocate for privacy in a technological age where fears of terrorism are cited as a rationale for government and law enforcement to have greater access to data. Over the past decade CDT has fought spyware, opposed greater use of wiretaps by the FBI on wireless phones and VoIP, and looked for a balance between protecting intellectual-property rights and allowing consumers fair use. No matter where you stand on these issues, it is helpful to understand the perspective of privacy advocates, such as the CDT.     @  You can get to the CDT’s Web site via SM Online.

A Site to See

- The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) is a leading advocate for privacy in a technological age where fears of terrorism are cited as a rationale for government and law enforcement to have greater access to data. Over the past decade CDT has fought spyware, opposed greater use of wiretaps by the FBI on wireless phones and VoIP, and looked for a balance between protecting intellectual-property rights and allowing consumers fair use. No matter where you stand on these issues, it is helpful to understand the perspective of privacy advocates, such as the CDT. @ You can get to the CDT's Web site via SM Online.

Privacy

- A federal appeals court has ruled that an employer did not violate an employee’s Fourth Amendment rights when it required her to submit to a psychological evaluation even though the evaluation was two hours long and required that the employee divulge details of her personal life. The court ruled that the company had the right to do so, even without a stated reason. (Greenwalt v. Indiana Department of Correction, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, 2005).

Privacy

- IIntroduced by Sen.Russell Feingold (D-WI), a new bill (S. 317) would protect the privacy of individuals by limiting government access to the records of libraries and booksellers.

The Open Society Paradox: Why the 21st Century Calls for More Openness, Not Less.

- To some extent, everyone zealously guards his or her own privacy and fights to preserve it. But what are the chances we are fighting to secure the wrong thing? What if greater openness and transparency could protect our society better than fighting to preserve privacy at all costs? This is the thesis of The Open Society Paradox, in which author Dennis Bailey argues forcefully for a homeland identification card, openness in government and society, and the use of sophisticated information analysis as a powerful triple play to reduce the risk of cybercrime and terrorism.

Background screening

- The Montana Supreme Court has ruled that an airport authority did not violate a prospective security officer’s privacy rights when it conducted two background checks on him and then terminated him for a 30-year-old arrest. (Barr v. Great Falls International Airport Authority, Montana Supreme Court, No. 03-536, 2005).

Trade secrets

- An Ohio appeals court has ruled in favor of a preliminary injunction barring an employee from using his former employer’s information in his new job. However, the court ruled that some of the information taken by the employee could not be included in the injunction because the company failed to take sufficient steps to protect it. (Liebert Corporation v. John Mazur, Ohio Court of Appeals, No. 1-04-2794, 2005)

Privacy

- A Washington appeals court has ruled that Steven White can proceed with his invasion of privacy lawsuit against his employer, a municipality. White, who was a town marshal, claims that when his boss revealed to a local newspaper that White suffered from epilepsy, the town illegally disclosed his private information. The town argues that since White suffered a seizure in public, the information was no longer private.

Privacy

- Privacy issues that arise when companies outsource services involving clients’ personal health information are examined in this GAO report.

Quick Bytes: Federal privacy law needed

- A group of large corporations, including Google, Microsoft, Eli Lilly, Oracle, and Eastman Kodak, along with the Center For Democracy and Technology, have created the Consumer Privacy Legislative Forum.

Trick and Treat

- Privacy, security, and hypocrisy.

Quick Bytes: Federal Privacy

- Read about the Consumer Privacy Legislative Forum, which was formed by major corporations to support consumer privacy legislation.

Security and Usability: Designing Secure Systems That People Can Use

- The six major parts of the book all have their enlightening moments, whether discussing authentication mechanisms or privacy and anonymity.
 




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