INFORMATION

Site Map - Privacy

The Privacy Management Toolkit

- In the early days of nuclear physics, many people scoffed at the notion that splitting an atom could devastate cities. They simply did not understand the power of the atom. In many ways, privacy is akin to the atom: it sits dormant among the minutiae of life until it is split, or invaded, unleashing forces that can have destructive consequences.

Private No More

- What Socrates can teach us about privacy concerns.

Privacy

- A bill (S. 2389) introduced by Sen. George Allen (R-VA) that would make it illegal to solicit, acquire, or sell another person’s confidential telephone records without that person’s consent has been approved by the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. A similar provision (S. 2178) has been approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee. S. 2178 would prohibit obtaining confidential phone records by fraud or any other unauthorized means from a telecommunications carrier or IP-enabled service provider. Under the measure, the sale of such records by anyone would be punishable by up to five years in prison. The penalty doubles for repeat violations within a 12-month period and for violations involving more than $100,000 or more than 50 customers. Law enforcement activities are exempt.

A Chip Off the Privacy Block?

- RFID tags are becoming increasingly popular, and a debate is underway over the privacy implications of this technology. Editor's Note: The discussion of a DHS report on RFID in the section entitled "Homeland Security" includes a correction from the print edition. The error was introduced by the editor, not the author.

States Share Criminal Justice Information

- The brief, entitled Protecting Privacy in Integrated Justice Systems, notes that some states are taking proactive steps toward privacy protection. It highlights Illinois, where the governor set up a group devoted to setting up privacy rights protection policies.

Privacy

- Several bills that would prohibit the sale of telephone records to third parties have been approved by congressional committees. Though the bills vary slightly in detail, they all would impose stiff penalties on violators. The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved S. 2178, which would prohibit obtaining confidential phone records by fraud or any other unauthorized means from a telecommunications carrier or IP-enabled service provider. Under the measure, the sale of such records by anyone is punishable by up to five years in prison. The penalty doubles for repeat violations within a 12-month period, and for violations involving more than $100,000 or more than 50 customers. Law enforcement activities are exempt under the bill. Two related bills (H.R. 4709 and H.R. 4714) have been approved by the House Judiciary Committee.

Consumer Privacy

- The Federal Communications Commission has issued a proposed rule requiring companies to take additional steps to protect consumer privacy.

Patient Privacy

- A New Jersey appeals court has ruled that filming an emergency room patient for a television program violated privacy laws.

Paying Up for Retail Privacy

- A study in which participants were given money to spend online found that they would pay more at a site with better privacy.

Defamation

- A police officer was acting within the course of his employment when he told a fellow officer that his new girlfriend might be infected with AIDS.

Internet Privacy

- Want privacy for your Internet searches? Then check out Ixquick, this month’s “Site to See,” the only metasearch engine that deletes the user’s personal data.

$42 Million Data Mining System Scrapped

- A $42 million Department of Homeland Security data mining system has been discontinued due to an inability to meet privacy standards.

Spies in the Sky: Spy Satellites Need Proper Oversight

- The Washington Post carefully endorses the use of domestic satellite images in domestic defense.
 




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