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Aviation security

- Five Fs, 4 Ds, 3 Cs, and 2 Bs. If you brought home a report card like this when you were a kid, you’d be grounded. The U.S. aviation security industry just brought home those grades, but don’t expect planes to be grounded any time soon. The “teacher” handing out these dismal marks is the Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations (CAPA), which brings together the 22,000-pilot-strong union membership of five airlines. The worst grades went to screening cargo, credentialing, crew training in self-defense, missile defense, and employee screening. In comments accompanying the report card, CAPA notes that “near total reliance” on the Known Shippers program for cargo screening is a “serious flaw.” Comments under credentialing note that the Transportation Security Administration has yet to deploy available biometric technology. Here’s the breakdown of grades: Barely receiving a passing grade of D were perimeter security, threat intelligence, federal flight-deck officers on passenger planes, and federal flight-deck officers on cargo planes. Grades of C went to passenger screening, federal air marshals, and classroom training for crew. Faring best, with grades of B, were bag screening and passenger flight-deck doors. “The reinforced doors are installed and appear to be working well,” say the comments accompanying the report card.@ The comments and the report card can be accessed via SM Online.

Chaos Organization and Disaster Management

- Kirschenbaum will make readers question their own motivations and choices. With that in mind, he leads readers down an avenue of constant exploration, probing the considerations of various stakeholders, the plethora of constraints on effective disaster management, and the bureaucratic inertia that can all too quickly subsume disaster management.

Have Passport, Will Travel: Field Notes for the Modern Bodyguard.

- Paul Markel, a former U.S. marine, ex-police officer, and current executive protection agent, has written an advice book for fledgling bodyguards. The book covers critical topics such as communications, confrontation, defensive tools, professionalism, legal issues, intelligence gathering, and foreign travel. It is not detailed enough to be considered a textbook on executive protection, but it probably was not meant to be.

Background screening

- The Montana Supreme Court has ruled that an airport authority did not violate a prospective security officer’s privacy rights when it conducted two background checks on him and then terminated him for a 30-year-old arrest. (Barr v. Great Falls International Airport Authority, Montana Supreme Court, No. 03-536, 2005).

Did You Know That?

- Anthrax attacks; China's demand for contractual security services.

Distinguishing Tourists from Terrorists

- The right to photograph the exterior of private buildings from a public place is protected by the First Amendment, say legal experts. So absent suspicious activity, photographers snapping photos should generally be left alone. That’s the case at the Sears Tower, for example, says director of security Keith L. Kambic, CPP.

Information Sharing Through Fusion Centers

- When Massachusetts opened its Fusion Center in October 2004, it became the seventh state to set up this type of information-sharing facility, intended to improve cooperation among federal, state and local agency personnel in the state. Major Robert Smith, deputy commander in the Massachusetts State Police, talked with Security Management about information sharing. Following are highlights from the conversation. (His remarks have been paraphrased to accommodate the magazine’s space limitations.)

Guarding Against Fatigue

- Strategies from the elite Escuela Campo Alegre for combating security guard fatigue. (Online Exclusive)

Alarm Monitoring

- A bill (formerly S.B. 453) signed into law by Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen will require that, when responding to an alarm, monitoring companies attempt to contact the property owner twice—by telephone or other electronic means—to determine whether an alarm is valid before dispatching police. Tennessee is the second state to enact such a law. Florida passed a similar measure last year.

Federal Prisons Don't Have Information to Decide if Outsourcing Saves Cash

- New GAO report says federal prisons have no way to currently compare the costs of keeping inmates at federal prisons or in private prisons.

Two Security Guards Slain in Brazen Robbery in Philadelphia

- Two security guards, both retired cops, murdered in ambush and robbery.

Blackwater Founder Defends His Contractors

- Says his contractors are not cowboys before a congressional committee.

Blackwater USA Sought to Cover Up Deadly Iraq Shootings

- A new congressional report faults the State Department for its lack of accountability and its permissiveness regarding the private security contractor.
 




Beyond Print

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