INFORMATION

Site Map - Government

U.S. Congressional Legislation: Disaster Management

- A bill (S. 3249) that would renew a grant program designed to help state and local governments prepare for disasters has been approved by the Senate. The House of Representatives will consider the measure. The competitive grant program would provide grants to state and local governments for projects that mitigate damage from natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods. A 2007 study on the program by the Congressional Budget Office found that the program is successful. For every $1 spent on the program, the federal government saved $3.  

U.S. Congressional Legislation: Homeland Security Grants

- A bill (H.R. 5562) that would amend the use of homeland security grants has been approved by the House Homeland Security Committee. The bill must now come before the full House of Representatives for a vote. Under the bill, the government could not require that grants issued under the Urban Area Security Initiative be used for specific purposes. Also, H.R. 5562 would require that the government study the costs of administering the grants to determine whether the grantees should be awarded a greater percentage of funds to be used for management and administration of the grant award.  

U.S. Congressional Legislation: Border Security

- A bill (S. 3243) designed to reduce corruption among border guards has been approved by the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. The Senate has not announced whether it will consider the bill. Under the measure, all applicants for law enforcement positions with U.S. Customs and Border Protection would be required to pass a polygraph examination before being hired. All existing law enforcement personnel would undergo periodic background investigations while employed by the agency.

Morning Security Brief: Background Investigations, Immigration Stats, Phone Security, and Anti-Counterfeiting Language

- Federal background investigators' handling of personal data they collect needs better oversight. Immigration enforcement claims are challenged. AT&T reportedly told by government not to buy certain phone equipment from a Chinese company. And draft of anti-counterfeiting agreement no longer has most controversial provisions.

Federal Protecive Service Reform Bill Advances in Senate

- A Senate committee has unanimously passed legislation aimed at reforming the troubled Federal Protective Service, which is responsible for the security of 9,000 federal buildings around the country.

The Law of Emergencies

- Nan Hunter's The Law of Emergencies is an excellent primer on how federalism complicates public health and disaster management.

Guiding Control System Cybersecurity

- The U.S. government helps protect critical infrastructure by providing owner-operators with IT security research and support.

Senate Bill to Reform Federal Protective Service Introduced

- Leadership of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee has introduced bipartisan legislation aimed at reforming the beleaguered Federal Protective Service, which is responsible for the security of roughly 9,000 federal sites nationwide.

Bill Would Require FPS to Examine Federalizing Contract Guards

- Legislation set for introduction Tuesday would require the Federal Protective Service to evaluate federalizing its mismanaged 15,000-member contract guard force, according to the bill’s co-authors.

U.S. Congressional Legislation: DNA

- A bill (H.R. 4614) introduced by Rep. Harry Teague (D-NM) that would provide grants to states for DNA collection has been approved by the House of Representatives. The bill is now pending in the Senate Judiciary Committee.The bill would increase existing grant funds for states that have DNA collection programs.

Numbers

- 10 The number in millions of cyberattacks launched against U.S. Energy Department systems daily, the former agency CIO told Forbes.

Biosurveillance Fusion Center Faces Information Sharing Hurdles

- The National Biosurveillance Integration Center faces the same stovepipes and turf battles that plagued earlier information-sharing efforts.

State Legislation: Oklahoma: RFID

- Oklahoma’s governor has vetoed a bill (H.B. 2569) that would have prohibited the use of RFID technology in state drivers’ licenses or state identification cards. The bill would have outlawed RFID tags as well as “any type of RFID ink in any format or configuration.”
 




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