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Site Map - The Workplace

Legal Report

- The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that its medical marijuana law does not apply to private employers and does not protect employees from being fired for drug use. And OSHA issues a new directive on workplace violence.

CHART: Sources of Corporate Data Breaches

- Insiders committed 43 percent of all security breaches.

Background Checks

- Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has signed a new law (formerly S.B. 361) making it illegal for employers to use credit reports to make employment decisions. Employers would not be allowed to require employees or applicants to consent to a credit check. Exceptions are made for financial institutions or any other industry where credit checks are required by law. Employers may also run checks if they believe employees are engaged in illegal activity or if the employer can provide evidence that the credit report is “substantially job-related.”  

Workplace Violence

- A new Connecticut law (formerly S.B. 970) requires healthcare facilities to conduct an assessment and then develop plans to prevent and respond to workplace violence. Employers must then train employees on the details of the programs. The law also requires that healthcare facilities maintain detailed records on workplace violence incidents and provide the number of incidents to the state’s health department. Under the law, any assaults on healthcare employees must be reported to local law enforcement within 24 hours.

Workplace Violence

- ASIS International and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) have issued a joint ASIS/SHRM Workplace Violence Prevention and Intervention American National Standard aimed at helping organizations implement policies and practices to more quickly identify threatening behavior and violence affecting the workplace.

ASIS International and SHRM Release Joint Standard on Workplace Violence

- ASIS International and the Society for Human Resource Management issued a joint Workplace Violence Prevention and Intervention American National Standard aimed at helping organizations implement policies and practices to more quickly identify violence affecting the workplace.

Weapons

- Maine Governor Paul LePage signed a law (formerly H.B. 35) making it illegal for employers to prevent employees from storing concealed firearms in their cars on company property. Under the bill, the employee must have a valid permit to carry a concealed firearm. The vehicle must be locked and the firearm out of sight. The law also provides immunity to companies. Employers cannot be held liable for damages, injury, or death resulting from the stored firearms even if the firearm is stolen from an employee’s car. An exception is made in cases where the employer or an agent of the employer intentionally solicits or procures an action that causes injury.

Economic Espionage

- A bill (S. 678) introduced by Sen. Herb Kohl (D-WI) would increase penalties for economic espionage. The bill would also require that the U.S Sentencing Commission consider a tiered system to address different types of espionage.

Retaliation

- A court has ruled that an employee can bring a retaliation claim against his former employer for actions the employer took after the employee’s termination. In the case, the employee was sued for defamation after he resigned. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that the employee could still sue the company for retaliation. (Psy-Ed Corporation v. Klein, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, No. SJC-10722, 2011)

How to Outsource Wisely

- Learn to avoid the pitfalls of poorly executed contracting arrangements and make your vendor a partner.

Bolstering Security Education

- Many security managers say end-user education is a central part of IT security. More regulations are also requiring that organizations demonstrate that they’re conducting such training.

Building an Enterprise-Wide Business Continuity Program

- The author explores widely accepted risk management principles and backs them up with real-world experience.

Whistleblowers

- The Sarbanes-Oxley Act does not protect whistleblowers who report violations to the media, according to a federal appeals court. In the case, two financial auditors told a newspaper reporter about auditing practices that they believed violated the law, and they provided the reporter with internal company documents. The court found that such violations may only be reported to federal authorities, members of Congress, or the company’s own officials.
 




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