INFORMATION

Site Map - Cybersecurity

Making Data Breaches Public

- When sensitive consumer information is stolen, the risk of identity theft rises. Many states have notification legislation; but, writes Michael Turner of the Information Policy Institute, federal rules are needed to prevent “patchwork responses.” Turner, in Towards a Rational Personal Data Breach Notification Regime, explains that a legislative solution is necessary because “market forces may undersupply notification,” since companies may not wish to notify consumers of a breach if the cost of doing so exceeds the expected damage to the company.

Antisocial Networking Sites

- The next time you visit a Web site on which users contribute much of the content—say, social networking sites like Myspace or photo-sharing sites like Flickr—be aware that some of the content other users are contributing may be malicious.

New in Plaintext

- Nancy Flynn, in her new book Blog Rules: A Business Guide to Managing Policy, Public Relations, and Legal Issues, doesn’t waste time in getting to the statistics.

Numbers

- 6 Percentage of organizations able to provide new employees access to all required applications and systems on their first day of work, highlighting the inefficiency of identity access and management practices, according to a study conducted by Computer Associates.

Quick Bytes: Encrypting data at rest

- Pressure to comply with regulatory efforts such as Sarbanes-Oxley and Gramm-Leach-Bliley is the key driver of enterprisewide encryption efforts, according to security professionals at 112 financial services companies surveyed by InfoTech, yet just over half of those surveyed said that encryption of data at rest is “a high priority for their organizations.” Less than a third said they think their firms are doing “an adequate job of encrypting data at rest.” Fifty-seven percent plan new encryption efforts in the near future. @ More results from Enterprise Encryption in the Financial Services Sector are available at SM Online.

Following Standard is Not Standard Practice

- Only one in five of the top 200 merchants is in compliance with the Payment Card Industry (PCI) data security standard more than a year after the standard went into effect to improve security among merchants and credit card processors.

A Plan for Sharing

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Laptop Lessons Learned?

- Who’s responsible for restoring the Web after disruption? Also, advice on laptop security, a book on corporate blogs, and slow compliance with the PCI data security standard.

Who Owns the Net?

- Who’s responsible for restoring the Web after disruption? Also, advice on laptop security, a book on corporate blogs, and slow compliance with the PCI data security standard.

Encrypting data at rest

- Pressure to comply with regulatory efforts such as Sarbanes-Oxley and Gramm-Leach-Bliley is the key driver of enterprisewide encryption efforts, according to security professionals at 112 financial services companies surveyed by InfoTech, yet just over half of those surveyed said that encryption of data at rest is “a high priority for their organizations.”

Laptop Lessons Learned?

- After a spate of well-publicized thefts of government laptops earlier this year, Clay Johnson III, deputy director for management with the Office of Management and Budget, sent a memorandum to department heads urging them to take action to safeguard information properly.

A Site To See

- It’s estimated that millions of Americans each year suffer identity theft. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has set up a Web site to help deter, detect, and defend against identity theft. The site contains a number of educational resources, including a 10-minute educational video that provides an overview of the problem, a PowerPoint presentation, and several PDF publications.  

New in Plaintext

- The book is best browsed through in front of a computer, because you’ll be eagerly visiting the Web sites he writes about and trying the software and tactics he describes. Many of the latter I had never heard of. For instance, in a chapter on how to work around censorship (government or corporate) of Web sites, he describes how to access banned Web pages by having them e-mailed to you. No special software is required; just send an e-mail containing the URL of the Web site you want to see to a certain e-mail address, and the full site will be sent back to you inside a return message.
 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.