INFORMATION

Site Map - Port Security

Port security

- In considering 2005 funding for the Department of Homeland Security, Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) introduced an amendment to substantially increase port security grants from the $6 million requested by the government to $500 million. These funds would go to federally mandated security tasks.

Cargo security

- Three bills that would enhance seaport and cargo security are currently under review by lawmakers.

Port security

- Two bills were introduced to address port security issues. The first bill (S. 1400) was approved by the Senate but was not considered in the House. The bill would have established an integrated coastal-observation system with several goals, including fighting terrorism and monitoring storm activity. The system would also have collected data on the marine environment and ocean life. Another Senate bill (S. 193), which would have required that the Department of Energy evaluate radiation detection systems for use at U.S. seaports, failed to win approval in its Senate committee. The system would have been used to detect the presence of a dirty bomb being smuggled into the U.S. aboard a cargo vessel.

Port security.

- A report says that the port of New York and New Jersey is "still very vulnerable.

Port security

- Exactly one year after 9-11, ABC News reported that a steel pipe containing a 15-pound cylinder of depleted uranium arrived from Istanbul, Turkey, in the United States, undetected by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). On the second anniversary of 9-11, ABC News reported that the same cylinder again eluded the CBP, this time arriving from Jakarta, Indonesia. The Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was asked to investigate. The Inspector General found that CBP officials followed protocols and procedures that were "not adequate to detect the depleted uranium." An unclassified, abbreviated version of the report can be found on SM Online.

Port security

- In a recent report, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reviewed the Coast Guard's progress in conducting threat assessments on the nation's most valuable ports. @ The full report is available at SM Online.

Massachusetts: Port Security

- A bill (S.B. 1349) has been introduced that would require the state government to devise regulations for the safe transport of hazardous materials in the state’s ports. The state would also be required to regulate the staffing and safe operation of escort vessels and equipment.

Port Security

- A bill (S. 1594) introduced by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-FL) would require that the U.S. Coast Guard establish an international committee to develop guidelines for the safe and secure handling and transportation of especially hazardous cargo to the United States. The bill would also require the government to establish a strategic plan to use assistance programs to assist foreign ports and facilities that lack effective antiterrorism measures in implementing port security antiterrorism measures.

Port security

- In any tabletop exercise involving multiple authorities and jurisdictions, it’s virtually certain that some of the lessons learned involve the need for better coordination, clear lines of authority, and improved information sharing. And so it has been with Coast Guard exercises on port security, says the Government Accountability Office (GAO). According to GAO auditors, 59 percent of the 82 exercises studied raised communication issues, including problems with interoperable radio communications, failure to share information with other agencies, and difficulties in accessing necessary classified information. Almost as many exercises were plagued with resource problems, including poor facilities or equipment. Forty-one percent of the exercises raised concerns about the participants’ ability to coordinate a command and control system, for example. Part of the problem, acknowledges the GAO, is that the National Response Plan, launched in January, wasn’t in place during the exercises. That plan supercedes all existing federal interagency emergency response plans. SM Online takes you to the report.

Port security

- The 2006 U.S. Government budget (H. Con. Res. 95) proposed by the Bush administration does not include funding for the port security grant program. The program, which has distributed $565 million since its inception in 2002, would be replaced by the Targeted Infrastructure Protection program. The new program would offer a total of $600 million in grants. Under the Targeted Infrastructure Protection program, ports would compete with other transit systems, railroads, and buses for funding. The Coast Guard, along with container security initiatives and trade partnership programs, would, however, see an increase in funding from 2005. @ Details of the budget, which had passed both houses at press time and awaited the President’s signaure, are available at SM Online.

Cargo security

- Two amendments to the 2006 appropriations bill for the Department of Homeland Security (H.R. 2360) would mandate new cargo security measures. The first amendment would require that all air cargo be inspected before being loaded onto passenger airplanes. This provision would take effect in 2008. The second amendment to the bill, which would take effect immediately after the bill is enacted, would require that passengers be notified that unscreened cargo is being loaded onto their flight. H.R. 2360 has been approved by the House and is now awaiting action in the Senate.

Port Security

- Lawmakers and witnesses recently discussed port security issues at a hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. The key issue raised at the hearing was grant funding for the various federal programs enacted after 9-11.

Transportation Worker Program Finally Set to Start

- The beleaguered Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) program's start date has finally been announced by the Department of Homeland Security.
 




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