INFORMATION

Site Map - Healthcare

Data Protection

- Under the measure, the Secretary of Health and Human Services would have developed a strategic plan to coordinate information regarding the implementation of standards for transmitting, coding, and protecting consumer health information.

OSHA.

- The bill would allow employees to exceed that 15-day time limit if the failure to contest results from “mistake, inadvertence, surprise, or excusable neglect.” H.R. 739 would also have allowed employers with 100 or fewer employees and a net worth of $7 million or less to collect attorney’s fees if they prevailed in a dispute with OSHA.

Privacy

- Privacy issues that arise when companies outsource services involving clients’ personal health information are examined in this GAO report.

Bioterrorism

- A bill (S. 2825) introduced by Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-MN) would require that the government award grants to improve the health of those living on the U.S. border with Mexico.

Data protection

- A bill (H.R. 4157) that is designed to improve the coordination and protection of health information has been approved by the House Ways and Means Committee. It is not yet clear whether the measure will continue on to a full vote in the House of Representatives.

Who’s Impersonating Hospital Inspectors?

- The fear is that the impostors are terrorists scouting hospitals for vulnerabilities, says Fred Roll, a healthcare security consultant and the president of the International Association for Healthcare Security and Safety (IAHSS).

Counterfeit drugs

- A bill (S. 2668) introduced by Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) would require that companies incorporate RFID tagging technology, tamper-indicating technologies, and security packaging into all prescription drugs. These technologies would be used only to authenticate the integrity of the drugs and would not be used to transmit any identifying information about healthcare practitioners, consumers, or advertisers. S. 2668 has no cosponsors and has been referred to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.

Mine safety

- A bill (S. 2803) designed to improve mine safety and protect the health of mine workers has been approved by both houses of Congress and is awaiting the President’s signature. The bill would require mine operators to adopt and maintain an accident response plan for when miners are trapped. Under the bill, the plan would include redundant local communications systems, emergency air supplies, escapeways, emergency training, and wireless communication systems to allow contact between trapped miners and officials on the surface. To encourage new technology, the bill would provide grants for those developing new mine safety equipment. S. 2803 would also establish an interagency working group to share technology, research, and developments in mine safety and emergency response.

Bioterror Focus Changing Public Health Systems

- Every U.S. state has an agency that handles public health, but how the public health apparatus functions from state to state diverges widely. Some agencies are freestanding, others are part of a larger health and human services department. The way they deal with local health agencies varies as well: some states centralize control over local health agencies, others grant local agencies wide latitude in operations, and still other states fall somewhere in between. The services provided by these agencies are also all over the map. Does the structure matter? Not really, say researchers at the RAND Corporation who recently examined “whether there is a link between how state and local public health departments are organized and the level of their emergency preparedness.” Read the report.

Hospitals Probing Stun Gun Use

- The use of stun guns by security departments of hospitals and medical centers may sound shocking, but they may be a safer alternative to physical force.

Preventing Wanderlust in Patients

- Hospitals and assisted-care facilities face the growing challenge of ensuring that patients with dementia can’t wander off the property and come to harm.

Putting Muscle into Access Control

- A 24-hour health club uses antitailgating devices as a way to exorcise freeloaders.

Drug Companies Gain from BioShield II

- BioShield also provided for grants to modernize existing biomedical and behavioral research facilities and construct new ones. It gave authority to the federal government to procure critical drugs using specially designated funds. In addition, BioShield amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) to allow specific drugs to be introduced to the public prior to FDA approval, provided the Homeland Security Secretary determined that a national emergency merited the use of such drugs.
 




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