INFORMATION

Site Map - Law Enforcement

Quick Bytes: Trilogy trips up

- The FBI's efforts to modernize its IT program--an effort known as Trilogy--"is not currently on a path to success." That assessment comes from a new book by the National Research Council of the National Academies, which concludes in part that the FBI has no contingency plan in case its new Virtual Case File application fails.

CD-Based Security Resources

- A new CD-based training tool, Securing Law Enforcement Computer Systems, is now available from the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C).

A Drooping Spam Law

- The CAN-SPAM law was a flaccid defense against unwanted e-mail, according to antispam company Commtouch, which analyzed hundreds of millions of spam messages in the first half of this year.

Quick Bytes: Trilogy trips up.

- The FBI's efforts to modernize its IT program--an effort known as Trilogy--"is not currently on a path to success." That assessment comes from a new book by the National Research Council of the National Academies, which concludes in part that the FBI has no contingency plan in case its new Virtual Case File application fails. The book also says that a gap remains between "IT and a coherent view of the bureau's mission and operational needs," which can only be closed with close involvement by the FBI's senior leadership. @ A Review of the FBI's Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Plan is available in PDF format.

CD-Based Security Resources

- A new CD-based training tool, Securing Law Enforcement Computer Systems, is now available from the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C). The CD is available at the NW3C's Web site, www.nw3c.org.

Surveillance

- The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin lays out the finer points of surveillance.

Tracking the Cybercrime Trail

- In addition to knowing how to follow the bits of evidence, forensic detectives must know how to work with law enforcement.

An Island of Protection

- Find out how the Secret Service worked with multiple law enforcement groups to protect the heads of state at the G-8 Summit in Georgia.

Aviation security

- Several bills currently under consideration in Congress are aimed at enhancing aviation security programs. One bill (H.R. 3959) introduced by Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ) would authorize the Homeland Security Department to provide air marshal training to law enforcement personnel from foreign countries. The bill has no cosponsors and has been referred to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Companion bills (H.R. 4126 and S. 2268) introduced by Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC) and Sen. Jim Bunning (R-NY), respectively, would alter the federal flight deck officer program--allowing pilots to carry firearms on commercial flights. The measure would add mental health standards and firearms training to the list of eligibility requirements. The bill would also prohibit the disclosure of information relating to a pilot's participation in the program and provide an appeal process for pilots who have been determined ineligible for the program.

Concealed weapons.

- A bill (H.R. 218) that would exempt off-duty and retired law enforcement personnel from compliance with concealed-weapons laws has been approved by both houses of Congress.

Concealed Weapons

- One is stored in what looks like an oversize locker key. Another sits inside a belt buckle. Others are concealed in brush handles, small crucifixes, and walking canes. These are among the ingenious knives and other weapons cataloged and exhibited by the FBI in a recently released guide to concealable weapons.

Community policing

- With some Muslim and Arab communities feeling under siege from U.S. security and law enforcement, the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) has been hosting law enforcement and multicultural community leaders to discuss how to prevent terrorist attacks and threats while respecting the rights and dignity of individuals. In a recent report, PERF offered various recommendations for balancing the two objectives. For example, law enforcement must learn about cultural sensitivities, traditions, and religions of diverse communities to engender trust, the paper suggests. It should also be aware of, and possibly participate in, community rallies, religious gatherings, and unity celebrations to better understand these cultures and religions. In addition, law enforcement should identify people and places susceptible to hate crimes and assess environmental design and other security factors to prevent these crimes. Further, the paper recommends, campus police should enter into mutual-aid agreements with local, state, and federal law enforcement to share resources on hate crimes and to coordinate operations during a crisis. @ Protecting Your Community from Terrorism: Strategies for Local Law Enforcement, Volume 2: Working with Diverse Communities is on SM Online.

Keystone to Antiterror Fight

-
 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.