INFORMATION

Site Map - Law Enforcement

Wiretaps

- Under a new proposed rule issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Internet phone calls--voice over Internet protocol, or VoIP--would be subject to federal laws governing wiretaps. This means that VoIP providers would have to equip their devices to allow law enforcement to intercept calls in cases where a court order is issued for surveillance.

Crisis negotiation

- In early September, four men in suburban Carácas disguised themselves as police officers and kidnapped the mother of Ugueth Urbina, a baseball pitcher from Venezuela who plays for the Detroit Tigers. The outcome of the incident was unknown at press time. That's just one example of how, in the globalizing marketplace, corporate executives and other high-profile personnel and their families are at constant risk of abduction.

Law enforcement responsibilities

- Two new reports look into changing responsibilities of federal law enforcement. One explores the transfer of the Federal Protective Service (FPS) to the Department of Homeland Security, noting that although FPS's mission has expanded, it does not have a transformation strategy to address this expanding mission. A second report analyzes the FBI's transformation to increase its focus on homeland security. Have the FBI's efforts to combat drug, white-collar, and violent crime suffered as a result? The results are mixed, say GAO auditors.

Fraud and Corruption Prevention and Identification

- Authors Nigel Iyer and Martin Samociuk avoid philosophical arguments on business theories regarding corporate fraud and corruption to provide practical and workable solutions for prevention and detection programs.

Shining Light on Nonlethal Weapons

- A new device that uses light to incapacitate suspects is the latest tool in law enforcement's nonlethal arsenal.

Miami Police to Test Drones

- The Miami-Dade Police Department will begin testing unmanned drones as law enforcement tools.

Private Security and Public Safety: A Community-Based Approach

- This book examines the concept of private security companies providing community-oriented crime prevention on a contract basis. Borrowing heavily from the experience of security practitioners, it is rich in detail, well thought-out, and comprehensive--a close look at a bold new way to protect neighborhoods with a high risk of crime.

Interstate Interoperability

- Danville, Virginia, didn't need an incident of national significance to drive home the need for interoperable communications.

Concealed weapons

- A law (P.L. 108-277) exempts off-duty and retired law enforcement personnel from compliance with concealed weapons except in certain circumstances. The law does not supercede state laws that allow private property owners to ban firearms on their property. Similarly, the law does not apply to state or local government buildings where firearms are prohibited.

Duress systems

- In the oft-spoofed television ad for a personal alarm, an elderly woman cries "I've fallen and I can't get up." As security professionals are well aware, it's not just the elderly and infirm who benefit from duress systems. Correctional officers, who are constantly at risk of being attacked, also need a quick way to call for assistance. The National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense have pulled together information on commercial systems and prepared a selection guide for correctional officers. Correctional Officer Duress Systems: Selection Guide provides detailed information on nine commercially available systems and vendor contact information. The guide divides duress alarms into three types. First are panic-button alarms, which are often found in banks. Second are identification alarms, which officers carry; they work by broadcasting a wireless signal to a nearby sensor, which forwards the alarm to a central console. Third are identification/location alarms, which are similar to ID alarms but can also track corrections staff and pinpoint alarm locations. The guide describes the benefits and drawbacks of each type of alarm. For example, while identification/location alarms provide the most information, they are also most costly and difficult to install. Links to both the report and a summary of it can be found on SM Online.

Intelligence reform

- Because significant changes in large organizations can take at least five to seven years, Congress might want to address the transformation of the intelligence community by lengthening the terms of directors, testified the GAO's J. Christopher Mihm before the Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia, of the Committee on Governmental Affairs. He also spoke about how the FBI has been matching special agents and analysts with critical skills to address its top priorities, a model that the intelligence community might want to follow.

White Collar Criminals Receive Less Attention After 9-11

- The threat of another 9-11, as well as Bush Administration priorities, has led to a drop in the prosecution of some defendants in favor of others.

Introduction to Crime Analysis: Basic Resources for Criminal Justice Practice.

- Written by two police crime analysts, the book is replete with resources to assist in gathering evidence for analyzing crime. Moreover, the authors explain the "Ten Commandments" of crime analysis as a way to inculcate best practices in the reader. The first commandment, for example, is "Thy Task is Crime Analysis. Thou Shalt Have No Other Tasks Before It," and the sixth commandment is "Thou Shalt Know Thy Jurisdiction from One End Unto the Other."
 




Beyond Print

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