INFORMATION

Site Map - Law Enforcement

GPS Tracking

- A state appeals court has ruled that in a case where an employer suspected that an employee was falsifying time sheets, it was not a violation of privacy to place a GPS tracking device on the employee’s car and record his movements for 30 days.

Blurring Military and Police Roles

- Blurring Military and Police Roles is a fascinating collection of scholarly essays on this subject from both the police and military points of view, as well as from historical, organizational, and operational perspectives.

Morning Security Brief: Tide Boosters, Trayvon Martin's Last Call, Outlaws Roam the West, and More

- Tide becomes the detergent of choice among shoplifters. Federal authorities take the Trayvon Martin case as new information emerges. “Sovereign Citizens” roam the Rockies. And more.

Morning Security Brief: Police Complaints, 911 Outage Blamed on Verizon, Food Import Security, and More

- Police complaints drop in Denver. Officials in Pennsylvania say equipment by Verizon caused their latest 911 center outage – the third in two weeks. The CDC says as imports increase, more outbreaks are being linked to imported food. And more.

Law Enforcement Perspective: International Association of Chiefs of Police Interview with Bart R. Johnson

- An interview with Bart Johnson, the executive director of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

Morning Security Brief: Records of Biodefense Mishaps Released, CBP Makes $800 Million Bust, DOJ Condemns Voter ID Law, and More

- Records obtained using FOIA show an increase in mishaps and reporting at biodefense lab. CBP helps recover 10,000 pounds of cocaine in 24 hours. The DOJ says Texas’ voter ID law unfairly targets Hispanic residents. And more.

Morning Security Brief: Fighting Bribery, Courthouse Security, Use of Force Questioned After Taser Use, and More

- Justice Department cracking down on bribery. Judges had raised concerns about security at Montesano courthouse. Police department shut down after use of force incident. And more.

Morning Security Brief: Eliminating Concealed Carry Permits, Pepper Spray Cop, Predator Uses Facebook to Lure Teen, and More

- State considering eliminating concealed carry permits. A court blocks the release of the investigative report of the "pepper spray cop" incident. Police say a man lured a teen to a hotel using Facebook. And more.

One-Hour DNA Tests Headed to 'Select Customers' this Summer

- An appeals court last summer said collecting DNA samples doesn’t violate constitutional protections and that DNA collection was just a 21st century version of fingerprinting. ZyGEM and Lockheed Martin want to provide a faster way to run the “prints.”

Detroit Police to Triage 911 Calls

- The Detroit Police Department will begin prioritizing 911 calls as part of ongoing efforts to improve emergency service.

Privacy

- Law enforcement does not need a warrant to obtain the IP addresses for Twitter users, according to a recent decision. In investigating contributors to Wikileaks, the federal government asked Twitter to turn over the suspects’ account information. A U.S. district court ruled that the government does not need a warrant and that Twitter users have no expectations of privacy.

Excessive Force

- A federal appeals court has ruled that the parents of a teenager killed by police may pursue their excessive-force lawsuit. The teen was armed with a pocketknife and was threatening to kill himself. An appellate court instructed the lower court to determine whether the officers could reasonably suspect that the teenager posed an immediate threat to their safety.

DNA

- A new standard out of the National Institute of Standards and Technology simplifies the transfer of DNA data across borders. It also provides more details on transmitting fingerprint and crime scene data.
 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.