INFORMATION

Site Map - Airport Security

Transportation

- The TSA is testing explosives screening at train stations--just one of several recently announced initiatives.

Quick Bytes: IT budgets flying high

- Airport IT security budgets are taking off, and airports worldwide are expected to invest some $2 billion in IT and telecommunications projects annually. That's according to the Airport IT Trends Survey conducted by the Airports Council International, Airline Business magazine, and SITA, a European IT company. The study showed that IT infrastructure projects were the top investment priority, followed by security-related solutions and passenger and baggage processing. More than 96 percent of airports will face additional IT-security challenges as they roll out wireless services by 2006 and implement e-commerce and other Web services. @ The full survey costs $245 and is available at the Airline Business Web site.

Quick Bytes: IT budget flying high

- Airport IT security budgets are taking off, and airports worldwide are expected to invest some $2 billion in IT and telecommunications projects annually. That's according to the Airport IT Trends Survey conducted by the Airports Council International, Airline Business magazine, and SITA, a European IT company. The study showed that IT infrastructure projects were the top investment priority, followed by security-related solutions and passenger and baggage processing. More than 96 percent of airports will face additional IT-security challenges as they roll out wireless services by 2006 and implement e-commerce and other Web services. @ The full survey costs $245 and is available at the Airline Business Web site.

Airport screeners

- The TSA has issued guidelines to help airports determine whether to revert to private screeners.

Airport screeners.

- The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has issued guidelines for airports to use in deciding whether to retain federal screeners or return to the use of private screening companies. Under laws passed after September 11, as of November 19, 2004, airports may start applying for the right to use contract security services.

U.S. Should Concentrate on Border and Airport Security, Says Chertoff

- Unlike Europe, the terrorist threat faced by the U.S. comes from without rather than from within.

Aviation and Airport Security: Terrorism and Safety Concerns

- Author Kathleen M. Sweet is well-credentialed with her military and aviation background. She has done her homework: Her presentation is well-outlined and clearly documented, focusing on how terrorism on commercial aviation affects the world economy. She also reviews terrorist threats, law enforcement efforts, and intelligence-community initiatives.

Passenger screening.

- The ACLU says that the TSA's new passenger-screening program for flyers is CAPPS II redux

New Israeli Device Said to Prevent 9-11 Type Hijackings

- Israeli officials say the system is foolproof.

Britain to Speed Up Airport Security Screening

- Most passengers should take no longer than 5 minutes to pass through security, says the government.

Government Investigators Smuggle Bomb Components Past Airport Security

- GAO says publicly available parts and knowledge could be used to assemble a bomb during an aircraft flight and do significant damage.

Aviation security

- A new rule proposed by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) would impose additional requirements on companies that ship cargo via aircraft. The rule would require that companies conduct background checks on workers who handle air cargo but do not operate within a secure area. Currently, only those employees in secure areas of operation are screened. Checks will also be required for all people traveling on an all-cargo aircraft regardless of their job. @ The rule can be found at Security Management Online

Baggage Screening

- A new report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO)assesses the effectiveness of explosives detection systems (EDS) and explosives trace detection (ETD) systems installed in airports around the country by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). The EDS and ETD machines were in place in most airports by the end of 2003. At the time, airport officials—especially those at small regional airports—expressed concern that the systems were too large to be incorporated into the baggage screening process and were installed as standalone devices in lobbies or other large areas. (See “Flying in the Danger Zone,” June 2002.) In the new report, the GAO tracks this issue of space and concludes that the interim solutions have resulted in inefficient screening practices and led to hiring of more screeners than necessary. Of the 130 airports studied by the GAO for the report, 86 are planning to integrate the EDS machines into baggage conveyor systems. However, the funding for such projects is limited and is beyond the reach of many airports. In the report, the GAO faulted the TSA for failing to conduct an overall analysis of the problem. According to the report, some airports have proven that they could make up the cost in long-term savings and through increased efficiency. @ To read the GAO report, visit Security Management Online.
 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.